Eat a Taco and Learn Some Science

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That’s exactly what will happen when you visit your local Del Taco. We’re excited to announce the release of four science toys that we wrote for Del Taco as part of their Kid Loco Meals. The four toys are called Loco 2 Liter Learning because each toy comes with cool science experiments you can try at home using a 2-liter soda bottle.

Each toy comes with a special toy that fits on top of a 2-liter soda bottle and a “deck” of cards with fun soda bottle science experiments. Learn how to make a tornado in a bottle, create a baking soda volcano, inflate a balloon in a bottle (impossible!), use a soda bottle as a bubble blower and create bubbling lava liquid… all in the name of science. Each deck also includes important information about recycling plastic.
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We at Steve Spangler Science are excited about Del Taco’s desire to make their kids’ meals both fun and educational. Teachers work hard to make science fun and meaningful in their classrooms. This type of informal science education is the next step in a wave of public response for greater emphasis on math and science. Any time we can make science fun outside the classroom, our chances are greater for getting kids hooked.

9 replies
  1. Kathy Oellerich
    Kathy Oellerich says:

    I wish there was a Del Taco up here in Minnesota. I would love to get a kid’s meal with the cool toys. Will you be offereing the items on your site?

    Reply
  2. Emma Tiebens
    Emma Tiebens says:

    I agree! I would love to be able to purchase the toy even without the meal! My 5-yr old son got one of the Loco2Liter Learning Toy (Deck2) from their “treasure chest” in school as a reward for doing something good. He carried that toy with him all day and he accidentally left it at a restaurant. HE WAS HEARTBROKEN and I want to surprise him wiht your toy. Please let me know how I can purchase them…Thank you so much!

    Reply
  3. Judy LaRocque
    Judy LaRocque says:

    It is fantastic that Sonic hooks kids at such an early age to the marvels of science. There are no Sonics in Ct and I wish there were!The Kids Meals at fast foods seem to only feature action figures.

    Reply
  4. neil sculman
    neil sculman says:

    Steve-A lesson for you

    When you teach as i did for 26 years and stay in there then consider yourself a science educator.Please dont market your product as science is so amazing.I know your in it to make money but please be honest that in order to succeed in science math and hard work is what is needed.It is not magic tricks.Well i dont expect a answer and i am not one to envy anyone.I get email i had from chemistry students who thanked me for helping them.The business i started 30 years ago was done befor all the gimmicks of the companies that are out there.Boot Camp,Blogs,and all the modern day stuff-Oh well Steve

    Neil Schulman

    Reply
  5. Steve
    Steve says:

    Neil — Sure, I’ll respond to your comments. I only taught in the classroom for 11 years (far cry from 26 years), but I think I got a good idea of what teaching science is all about. My current assignment in the Littleton Public Schools keeps me in “practice” as well. Some teachers get upset that I pulled together a group of my favorite teachers back in 1991 and started Steve Spangler Science, but I’m not sure why. Maybe it’s because we (the original group of teachers) all still like to teach… we all believe that teaching science is fun and learning science is even more fun. Neil, great teachers like yourself work hard to make learning a subject like science fun and challenging even though we both know that it’s hard work. I checked out your business (just Google Neil Sculman and scroll down) and you seem to be promoting the idea that science is fun, exciting and amazing. I think that we’re on the same team, but I sense that there’s another issue here.

    Reply
  6. Beth
    Beth says:

    Gee Neil, do you need a band aid for that bite you incurred from the proverbial Green-Eyed Monster? Let me get this straight…. you started a science business and then 4 years later became a teacher? That implies that YOU were in it for the money and teaching was a second choice. Did you become a teacher to insure you would have a new batch of customers each year? Apparently your 30 year business isn’t very good if no one has heard of you ~ or is that why you wrote in to Steve’s blog? To mooch a little attention from the hoards of REAL science teachers who concur with Steve’s educational philosophies and who are dedicated to making science and ALL LEARNING fun ?!?!?! So, here you are Neil, you have your nano-second in the sun to air you sour disposition. Now, leave the rest of the REAL science teachers alone we are busy watching and learning from Steve on the History Channel and the Discovery Channel and the Food Network and the Ellen Degeneres Show……. and then the REAL science teachers take that enthusiasm and energy we glean from Steve and SHARE IT WITH OUR STUDENTS!!!!!!! For if the children are not excited about science – if they think it is just too “hard” – they will never pursue a career in it!!!!!!! Go phishing in someone else’s pool, Neil, because Steve Spangler is way out of your league.

    Reply
  7. Kaley Belilla
    Kaley Belilla says:

    If Neil was a teacher for 26 years, I see why the public thinks that we’re failing as teachers. Just look at the way he writes. Re-read his comment and you’ll see that there’s an error in every sentence he writes. That’s amazing, and he taught for 26 years. I did attend one of Steve’s workshops in Houston several years back and his whole workshop is about making science fun by connecting concepts to real world experiences. I came away feeling better about my teaching and excited to want to teach more. Steve reminded this 17 year teacher that I chose the right profession. Neil, consider early retirement.
    Kaley, 3rd grade teacher, San Diego

    Reply
  8. Jade
    Jade says:

    As a Kindergarten teacher of 20 years, I am proud to say that Steve has had an enormous impact on how I teach science! He has shown me how early childhood science can be so much more than collecting leaves and mixing colors! Imagine exploring the concepts of chemistry, density, sound and water conservation all at the age of five years old! Without Steve Spangler opening my eyes to these possibilities, my students never would have had these experiences. Never once have I heard any of my students say science was “too hard”!!!!!!
    ALL students can do science when lessons are presented in a style that is fun and inviting, and not the holy-er than thou attitude of some. Steve Spangler taught me that and a lot more. As for the future of my budding scientists, it is my fervent hope that they will have enthusiastic science teachers who think outside the box, keep their outdated teacher’s manuals dusty on a shelf and often use a special kind of “science magic” as a source of inspiration throughout their entire school careers!
    Oh, and as for Neil… all that “modern day stuff” like blogs and conferences and distance learning are advancements in global communications that your students should be learning about.

    Reply
  9. Julie
    Julie says:

    I am a Science Ambassador – a member of a nation-wide think tank of science teachers dedicated to help fellow teachers incorporate more science into their curriculum. This group of highly trained science specialists travels throughout the country speaking at educational forums. Guided by the National Hands-on Science Institute and Steve Spangler, the Science Ambassadors reach out to encourage, inspire and support thousands of our nations teachers every year. This is no “gimmick.” This is no “magic trick.” This is no “business scheme.” This is real teachers giving back to their profession, and it’s all thanks to the courage and vision of Steve and a few thousand other teachers who share his same teaching philosophy. Steve has demonstrated nothing but dedication to the advancement of science education in our nation. If that means getting a science experiment rather than an action figure into the hands of a child via a taco meal, then we could all learn a thing or two from him… in my humble opinion.

    Reply

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